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Commonly asked questions about breast cancer recurrence
Written by: Jennifer Koski
Learn More – Commonly asked questions about breast cancer recurrence
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Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Surgical options for breast cancer treatment
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How to manage late effects of breast cancer treatment
Written by: Jennifer Koski
Learn More – How to manage late effects of breast cancer treatment
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Navigating work when you’re going through cancer treatment
Written by: Mayo Clinic Press Editors
Learn More – Navigating work when you’re going through cancer treatment
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Facing the mental and emotional challenges of breast cancer as a Black woman
Written by: Taayoo Murray
Learn More – Facing the mental and emotional challenges of breast cancer as a Black woman
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How to talk to your kids about a cancer diagnosis
Written by: Mayo Clinic Press Editors
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Staying mentally healthy after breast cancer treatment ends
Learn More – Staying mentally healthy after breast cancer treatment ends
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What’s happening with colon cancer in young people?
Written by: Whitney Harris, M.D.
Learn More – What’s happening with colon cancer in young people?

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  • Article |

    Commonly asked questions about breast cancer recurrence

    Jennifer Koski
    For those who have had breast cancer, a common fear is that it comes back. If it does, you might feel a range of emotions, including anger and confusion. It’s also natural to have questions. Here’s what Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a breast health specialist at Mayo Clinic and a professor…
  • Most people diagnosed with breast cancer undergo surgery to remove their cancer from the breast as well as have lymph nodes removed as part of their treatment. “Surgical resection of the tumor from the breast and also evaluation of the lymph nodes are used for the vast majority of…
  • Article |

    How to manage late effects of breast cancer treatment

    Jennifer Koski
    When cancer treatment is over, many people feel relief. They no longer experience the side effects that come along with treatment. But it’s also a time to keep asking questions. That’s because no matter the treatment plan, there’s a possibility that some new symptoms — called late effects of cancer…
  • Article |

    Navigating work when you’re going through cancer treatment

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Decisions about work during cancer treatment can be tied to big emotions and financial concerns. And everything from your treatment plan to how stressed you are at your job can make a difference as you weigh the options. Not everyone is able to or wants to keep working. And if…
  • Article |

    Facing the mental and emotional challenges of breast cancer as a Black woman

    Taayoo Murray
    “Are you sure?!” That was the question Sharon Gill’s husband kept asking the nurse who called to inform the couple about Sharon’s breast cancer diagnosis. American women have an overall 12% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. And yet, like most women, Gill was surprised and mentally unprepared to hear…
  • Article |

    How to talk to your kids about a cancer diagnosis

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    No matter how old children get, learning that their parent or caregiver is ill can be scary. It’s normal for kids to have questions about what the diagnosis means and how it will affect them. Deciding when and what to tell your kids about a cancer diagnosis is hard, whether…
  • Book Excerpt |

    Staying mentally healthy after breast cancer treatment ends

    The first few months after cancer treatment can be challenging. Making the transition from receiving intensive illness-oriented treatments to no treatment or long-term management isn’t always easy or smooth. You might be surprised by some of the uneasy feelings that can follow. You might even feel like the support of…
  • Article |

    What’s happening with colon cancer in young people?

    Whitney Harris, M.D.
    Are you a 40-something-year-old, living your best healthy life? Is an eventual colonoscopy at 50 barely even a thought in the back of your mind? If so, think again. As of 2021, recommendations say to start colon cancer screening at age 45, and that’s for those…
  • Book Excerpt |

    Treatment for metastatic breast cancer

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    When breast cancer spreads to other areas outside of the breast, such as bones, lungs or liver, it’s referred to as metastatic breast cancer. Other terms commonly used are advanced cancer or stage IV cancer. Some people have metastatic breast cancer when they’re first diagnosed, but metastases more often develop…
  • Book Excerpt |

    Your emotions after learning you have metastatic breast cancer

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Shock. Anger. Fear. Grief. These are all natural feelings After learning that you have metastatic breast cancer, yet coping with these strong emotions can be one of the biggest challenges you’ll face. It’s tempting to want to hide away or deny all that’s happening. And there may be days when…
  • Book Excerpt |

    Hormone therapy for advanced prostate cancer

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    The cornerstone of treatment for advanced prostate cancer is medications that shut off the production and activity of male sex hormones (androgens). Testosterone is the main male sex hormone responsible for masculine features and the development of male reproductive organs. Testosterone also supports the spread of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer…
  • Book Excerpt |

    Relieving advanced prostate cancer pain

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Prostate cancer in its early stages typically isn’t painful. However, once the cancer has spread beyond the prostate gland to nearby bone — the pelvic bones and, eventually, the spine — it may produce intense pain. For reasons that aren’t clear, prostate cancer cells often migrate to bone tissue as…

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