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All Major Depressive Disorder

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All Major Depressive Disorder

  • Article |

    Depression: Supporting yourself

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Unlike many other health problems — such as a broken bone or high blood pressure — a mental illness such as depression can come with fears, misunderstanding, and stigma that can make it difficult to seek care and stick with a care plan. In addition, treatment for depression typically isn‘t…
  • Article |

    Making the most of virtual therapy for depression or anxiety

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Talking to a mental health professional (psychotherapy) can be very helpful in treating depression and anxiety disorders. A therapist can help you learn new ways of thinking about difficult situations. A therapist may also help you face and change old habits that may be contributing to your depression. Therapy was…
  • Article |

    Supporting a loved one or friend with depression

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    If someone you know has depression, you may feel helpless and wonder what to do. However, a good starting point is to understand that depression isn‘t anyone’s fault or failing. It’s also not something your loved one can easily manage without help from a healthcare professional — and from supportive…
  • Article |

    Depression’s new directions

    Mayo Clinic Press Editors
    Depression is often misunderstood as temporary feelings of distress or sadness. Phrases such as “I’m feeling stressed” or “I’m having a rough week” — while not to be dismissed — are not typical descriptions of how depression feels. Instead, those who have depression describe a feeling of darkness and hopelessness,…
  • Article |

    Adjusting your depression treatment

    Alisa Bowman
    Finding the best depression treatment for you can sometimes seem like a series of science experiments that fail to yield positive results. After trying an initial antidepressant for two months, you still feel worn out, “brain fogged,” hopeless and restless. So your healthcare professional suggests switching to another option. That…
  • Article |

    Antidepressant test: Is your depression treatment working?

    Alisa Bowman
    If antidepressants worked like antibiotics, you wouldn’t need a self-test to gauge their effectiveness. Your reduction in symptoms would occur so quickly that you’d know, without second-guessing yourself, whether you were taking a dud or a winner. However, unlike antibiotics, antidepressants require a month or longer to work. Often, you…

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