Why We Revolt

A Patient Revolution for Careful and Kind Care

Victor M. Montori , M.D.

  • The American healthcare system has become increasingly exploited and industrialized.
  • As the costs of health insurance and standard medical procedures continue to soar, physicians are pressured to push through cases without regards for patient satisfaction and the system pursues standardization, which causes individualized healthcare to become generic and impersonal

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Description

infoThe Facts

8.3%

of adults aged 18 and over did not receive medical care due to cost in 2019.

Why We Revolt: A Patient Revolution for Careful and Kind Care, second edition, describes the obvious and prescribes the impossible. It’s read in clinics and in academia, and discussed in pubs, cafés, and living rooms, on Twitter chats and podcasts. There, the book has added its voice to an emerging consensus for change. It offered the choir — tired of drawing from the songbook of despair — words for their songs of hope.

In a series of brief and personal essays, Why We Revolt describes what is wrong with industrial healthcare, how it has corrupted its mission, and how it has stopped caring. Montori rescues the language of patient care to propose a revolution of compassion and solidarity, of unhurried conversations, and of careful and kind care.

This edition has a better chance to reach further and to continue to create meaningful conversations among its readers. In the years since Why We Revolt first appeared in 2017, this difference has expanded, and we have grown hungrier for a revolution.

Published 2020 • 192 pages • All rights: Mayo Clinic Press

Victor MontoriVictor M. Montori , M.D.

Considered “a patient’s doctor” Montori received the Karis Award, a patient-nominated recognition for his compassionate care. A researcher in the science of patient-centered care, Montori and his colleagues have authored over 650 research articles. As a full professor of medicine by age 39, Victor is today one of the most cited clinical researchers in the world.

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